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John C. Calhoun, CharlestonLast week a group of us attended the Charleston Conference, focusing on library acquisitions and collection management issues.  (Charleston, South Carolina is a beautiful city, with great food and better hospitality.) The conference provided an opportunity to hear how others—in libraries, scholarly publishing and information systems—are dealing with the continuing evolution of print to electronic resources.  Those of us from Wesleyan and CTW also shared our experiences of weeding projects and shared purchase-on-demand e-book programs.

Here are a few highlights:

Librarians in the Post-Digital Information Era: Reclaiming Our Rights and Responsibilities.  The conference got off to a rousing start with Jenica Rogers from SUNY Potsdam.  Several months ago Jenica made news when she publicly announced that her library would not renew their contract with the American Chemical Society, due to their insistence on certain contract terms.

Jenica’s talk was addressed to librarians, calling us to defend our institutions from unreasonable practices by for-profit vendors.  She specifically challenged us to refuse to sign non-disclosure agreements with respect to prices and licensing terms, calling instead for transparency and a free exchange of information.  She likened the current business relationship between libraries and vendors to an abusive domestic relationship.  Jenica urged us not to continue to act co-dependently towards vendors, and to challenge terms that are unreasonable or predatory. “There is a price for stepping forward, but you need to consider the cost of not stepping forward.”

 

Firehouse dog

Changes in scholarly publishing:  The traditional mission of the scholarly society is to facilitate communication between researchers in a specific field.  But the digital age has reduced the need for scholars to attend conferences or read journals—there are so many ways to share work easily and quickly with colleagues online.  And the open access movement, which for more than a decade has been exploring new, more sustainable models for sharing research than the traditional journal, is a potential threat to an important revenue source for scholarly societies.

Will the digital age be the death of these societies or the means to revitalize them?  Representatives from the American Chemical Society, the Modern Language Association and others discussed their plans for making their societies relevant in an electronic age.  The MLA Commons is one example of a site meant to bring scholars together to share their work.

 

PillarsLibraries as publishers:  There is a growing trend in libraries to engage in some form of publishing.  The Library Publishing Toolkit has been created by a group of New York State libraries to share case studies and best practices for library publishing efforts.  And bepress has just announced a certification course for library-led publishing initiatives.

Bryn Geffert, Amherst College Librarian, spoke about the recently established Amherst College Press.  The ACP is experimenting with a new open access model funded using library and other institutional resources.  There will be no cost to access their publications, and no author fees.  The plan is to eventually shift library funding for subscriptions and access—which restricts use to members of an institutional community—to funding for the creation of high-quality scholarly products that are accessible to everyone.

Rick Anderson of the University of Utah described the digitization of unique special collection and archival material as a form of publishing—allowing the discovery and dissemination of previously unique material to the entire scholarly community.

Scholarly publishing is no piece of cake: The Scholarly Kitchen recently posted an entry: 73 things that publishers do, providing insight into what goes into publishing an scholarly work.

 

Collections are for Collisions: Let’s Design It Into the Experience. Steven Bell of Temple University gave an engaging talk on how to engineer meaningful serendipity between our users and collections.  What can we do to facilitate a spark between a student and a work that might change their life?   Ideas for doing this include:

blinddate

–          Creating ‘impulse zones’ with books in places where people are but books usually aren’t (computer labs, for example).

–          Having students curate displays of works that are important to them, and explaining why.

–          Establishing a “Blind date with a book” program – Wrap up library books with a barcode on the wrapping – urging students to check them out.

–          Partnering with faculty to create alternative, more affordable textbooks.

–          Experimenting with systems that allow online browsing (although so far, simple online ‘browsing’ does not have the same impact as browsing print books in the stacks).

 

Changing Academic Library Operations.  Jim Dooley from the University of California-Merced, talked about how their library has evolved since the University was established in 2005.  At the time it was unclear whether or not the library would be much used, since so much content was even then available online.  But the library is a popular space for socializing and hanging out as well as for study.  All but a handful of their serials are online.  But they have collected over 100,000 print books so far, and they continue to collect print books as well as provide access to e-books via demand-driven acquisition programs with EBL and MyiLibrary.

 

Creating Screen Literacy: Bridging the New Digital Divide.  Paul Chilsen, Todd Kelley, and Christine Wells of Carthage College gave a fascinating talk on the work of the Rosebud Institute in making students—from kindergarten through college—literate in the elements of effective media in a culture dominated by the screen.  Screen fluency is directly analogous to writing fluency—they are both aspects of communication literacy.

At the Rosebud Institute they guide students in the production of media projects.  This is not to create film-makers, but to teach students how to communicate using screen technologies.  It is not about learning the technology itself—Carthage has developed a peer mentoring program for students to teach each other about the latest applications.  It is about learning the essential elements in media creation and story-telling, regardless of the technology used. Knowledge of these elements makes for a more critical, thoughtful consumer of media.

It also makes students more aware and in control of their personal digital assets—their information on Facebook, Twitter, and other social networking sites, for example—and how they might use them to shape an authentic, distinctive online ‘voice.’  Dr. Kelley showed an entertaining but frightening YouTube video on the amount of personal information and how it might be used:   http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=RNJl9EEcsoE .

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So I was walking down a Charleston street when I see a key on the ground.  jantzenkey

“Oh,” I thought, “Somone dropped their key.”

Then I looked up:

jantzensign

A little late, but here are links to two versions of the library’s annual report for last year:

Prezi presentation (about 10 minutes long)

Full report in pdf

Next, our goals for the coming year …

Welcome to Wesleyan University!  Here are some links to useful pages about library resources and services.

Q:  What libraries make up Wesleyan University Library?

Wesleyan University Library is made up of three libraries.  Olin Library is the main campus library, on Church Street between Clark Hall and the Public Affairs Center (commonly known as the PAC).   It houses collections in the humanities and social sciences, Scores & Recordings and the World Music Archives, and Special Collections & Archives.  The Reserve Desk and Office and Interlibrary Loan Office are also in Olin.

 

The Art Library is in the Davison Art Center at 301 High Street.  It contains collections in art, architecture and photography.  Reserve services for most art classes are also provided in the Art Library.  Susanne Javorski is the Art Librarian.

 

 

The Science Library (commonly known as SciLi, pronounced sci’li) is in the Exley Science Center at 265 Church Street.  It contains collections in the sciences.  It also houses the DVD collection and compact storage on the ground floor with print science journals and older materials in all subject areas.   Melissa Behney is the Science Librarian.

 

Q:  How do I get to the library’s website?

Just go to: http://www.wesleyan.edu/library/.  The library’s website has links to information on our resources, services, facilities and systems.

The Library OneSearch bar allows you to do a single search to find the information you need from most of the library’s catalogs and electronic resources.  For more information, go to the Library FAQ page.

 

Q:  Where can I go for a detailed list of library services and information for undergraduates and graduate students?

Go to the Information For Students page: http://www.wesleyan.edu/library/infoforyou/forstudents.html

 

Q:  How do I get to material that is on reserve for my class?

The library provides both physical and electronic reserves, available shortly before classes start.  To find print or other physical materials on reserve for your class, go to the Course Reserve search page.  You can search by instructor, course number, or course name.  Most physical reserve items are available at the Olin Library Reserve Desk on the first floor.  The Art Library has some reserve material for courses in the arts.

To find materials on electronic reserve, go to the E-Res page.   Again, you can search by instructor, course number, or course name.   Once you have entered the password your instructor gives you, you will come to a list of links to materials on electronic reserve.

 

Q: What kinds of primary sources are available at Wesleyan?

Wesleyan has a rich Special Collections & Archives department, including rare books, manuscript collections, university archives, and local history materials. These collections are frequently used by faculty across the disciplines for academic research and as integral parts of their course curricula. SC&A has a website that describes some of the holdings: http://www.wesleyan.edu/library/schome/ and the staff are glad to answer any questions you might have about your research needs or class visits. Contact them at sca@wesleyan.edu or call (860) 685-3864.

 

Q: Where can I find information about Wesleyan’s collections of images, video and audio recordings, and statistics/data sets?

For the broadest search across many types of resources, use Library OneSearch.  The Find Research Materials page has tips and links to find imagesvideo, audio, archives, and WesScholar, the online archive of the work of Wesleyan faculty and students.  Many academic departments have departmental collections some of which are searchable using the Departmental Collections catalog.

For information on finding international statistics and data sets: http://libguides.wesleyan.edu/Worldstats

For information on finding U.S. statistics and data sets: http://libguides.wesleyan.edu/USstats

 

Q:  What help does the library offer in finding and using research sources for papers and projects?

You can sign up for an appointment with a librarian, who will work with you to find appropriate resources for your assignment.  Online Subject and Research Guides are also available with links to online resources specific to each discipline.

You can also come to the Olin Library Reference Desk on the first floor for in-person help, call the reference desk at x3873, chat online using Reference Live Help, email or text us: (860) 415-4205.

 

Q:  How do I look for books in the library?

For the broadest search across many types of resources, use Library OneSearch.

If you are specifically looking for books in our collections, search in Caleb, the library’s catalog.  In Caleb, you can do a search by title, author, subject, or keyword.  Once you’ve found the book you want, write down the location and call number. (If you have a smartphone, you can also text yourself the call number using the Text me this Call  Number link on the right side of the screen.)

Once you have a location and call number, you can find the book using the Finding Materials By Call Number page.

— To do a catalog search from your smartphone, go to our mobile catalog.

 

Q:  The library doesn’t have the article or book I need.  How do I get material through interlibrary loan (ILL)?

To sign up for an ILL account, go to: https://wesleyan.hosts.atlas-sys.com/illiad/FirstTime.html

After filling out a brief form you will have an Illiad account and be able to submit online requests for materials that the library does not provide access to locally.  You will be notified when the item is available.

 

Q:  What is the CTW Consortium?

The CTW Consortium consists of Connecticut CollegeTrinity College, and Wesleyan University, all liberal arts schools in Connecticut.   The libraries share an online catalog and collaborate on a number of system and collection-related initiatives.  We also share our collections, and students and faculty can request materials from other libraries in the consortium, which are shipped in 1-2 business days.   To do a search in the CTW catalog, go to: http://ctwsearch.wesleyan.edu/vufind/

If Connecticut or Trinity have an item and Wesleyan does not, you can request the item by clicking on the Make a Request link in the record for the item.

 

Q: How can I access online resources when I’m not in the library?

Students, faculty and current Wesleyan staff can get to most of the library’s electronic resources through the Wesleyan proxy server, by entering their Wesleyan email user name and password.

 

Q: How can I keep up with library news—changes in hours, improved services, new resources, and library events and exhibits?

You can find out what is going on at the library in a variety of ways.   WesLibNews is the library’s Twitter feed; we also have a Facebook page and a Library News blog.  Or you can contact us by calling 860-685-2660 or by sending an email: reference@wesleyan.edu.

We look forward to meeting and working with you.  Best wishes for the coming year!

Welcome to Wesleyan University!  I’m Pat Tully, University Librarian.  Here is some basic information about library resources and services.  If you have other questions you’d like to see answered on this blog or answered privately, please email me at ptully@wesleyan.edu, or call me at 860-685-3887. 

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Q:  What libraries make up Wesleyan University Library?

Olin LibraryOlin Library is the main campus library, located at 252 Church Street between Clark Hall and the Public Affairs Center (commonly known as the PAC).   It houses collections in the humanities and social sciences, Scores & Recordings and the World Music Archives, and Special Collections & Archives.  The Reserve Desk/Office and Interlibrary Loan Office are also in Olin, as is the Office of the University Librarian.

 

Art Library The Art Library is in the Davison Art Center at 301 High Street.  It contains collections in art, architecture and photography.  Reserve services for most art classes are also provided in the Art Library.  Susanne Javorski is the Art Librarian.

 

 

Science LibraryThe Science Library is in the Exley Science Center at 265 Church Street.  It contains collections in the sciences.  It also houses the DVD collection and compact storage on the ground floor with print science journals and older materials in all subject areas.   Melissa Behney is the Science Librarian.

 

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Q:  How do I get to the library’s website?

QR code for library catalog

Just go to: http://www.wesleyan.edu/library/.  The library’s website has links to information on our resources, services, facilities and systems.  The Library OneSearch bar allows you to do a single search to find the information you need from most of the library’s catalogs and electronic resources.  For more information, go to the Library FAQ page.

To search the library catalog using your smartphone, use this QR code to access our mobile site:

 

Q:  How do I get material through interlibrary loan (ILL)?

To sign up for an ILL account, go to: https://wesleyan.hosts.atlas-sys.com/illiad/FirstTime.html  After filling out a brief form you will have an Illiad account and be able to submit online requests for material that is not locally accessible.

Q:  What is the CTW Consortium?

The CTW Consortium consists of Connecticut CollegeTrinity College, and Wesleyan University.     The libraries share an online catalog and collaborate on a number of system and collection-related initiatives.  We also share our collections, and students and faculty can request materials from other libraries in the consortium, which are shipped in 1-2 business days.   To do a search in the CTW catalog, go to:  http://ctwsearch.wesleyan.edu/vufind/

If Connecticut or Trinity have an item and Wesleyan does not, you can request the item by clicking on the Make a Request link in the record for the item.

Q: How can I request that a book, journal or other resource be added to the library’s collection?

To request that the library acquire a book, journal subscription or other resource, contact the liaison for your department.  You may also fill out the Request a Purchase form that is linked to the library web page.

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Q: What kinds of primary sources are available at Wesleyan?

Wesleyan’s Special Collections & Archives includes significant collections of rare books, manuscript collections, university archives, and local history materials. These collections are frequently used by faculty across the disciplines for academic research and as integral parts of their course curricula. SC&A’s website describes these holdings in more detail.  Director of Special Collections & Archives Suzy Taraba, University Archivist Leith Johnson, and the SC&A staff are happy to answer your questions and work with you and your students.  Contact them at sca@wesleyan.edu or call (860) 685-3864.

Q:  How do I put material on reserve for my class?

The library provides both print and electronic reserves.  For more information about how to put material on reserve for your class, go to the Academic Course Reserve page or contact EunJoo Lee, Head of Access Services (phone: 860-685-3454).

Q:  How does the library teach students to find and use research sources for papers and projects?

Students can sign up for a Personal Research Session (PRS for short) with a librarian, who will work with them to find appropriate resources for their assignment.  Online subject and research guides are also available with links to online resources specific to each discipline.   To arrange for a library instruction session for your class, or to explore creative ways to teach both course content and subject resources for research, contact the librarian liaison to your department or program.

Q: How do I get access to the library’s electronic resources from off-campus?

Current students, faculty and staff can get to most of the library’s electronic resources through the Wesleyan proxy server, by entering their Wesleyan email user name and password.

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WesScholarQ: How can I add my publications to WesScholar?

WesScholar is Wesleyan’s online archive of undergraduate honors theses, faculty publications, and other Wesleyan collections.  You may increase the visibility of your publications by adding them to WesScholar; for more information about doing so contact University Archivist Leith Johnson.

 

Q:  Where can I get a detailed list of library services and information for faculty?

You can go to the Wesleyan University Library Services for Faculty page, or contact the librarian liaison for your department.

Q: How can I keep up with library news—changes in hours, improved services, new resources, and library events and exhibits?

You can find out what is going on at the library in a variety of ways.  WesLibNews is the library’s Twitter feed; we also have a Facebook page and a Library News blog.  Or you can contact us by calling 860-685-2660 or by sending an email: reference@wesleyan.edu.

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We look forward to meeting and working with you.  Best wishes for the coming year!

WesCardinals

 

2013 ACRL Conference in IndianapolisThis past week I attended the 2013 Association of College and Research Libraries (ACRL) Conference in  Indianapolis.  (Great city—very walkable with wonderful restaurants and museums.)  The ACRL Conference provides opportunities to talk to colleagues and vendors about developments in academic library systems, resources and services.  This is the first post in a series about issues raised at the conference:

Health Equity in Academic Libraries, Not Just For Those We Serve. Presenter: Kiyomi Deards (University of Nebraska – Lincoln)

What is the culture of sickness and wellness in the organization?  Ongoing health issues range from socially acceptable (for example, allergies or asthma) to stigmatizing (mental health problems, ‘invisible’ issues like chronic fatigue syndrome).  It is important to have a documented and well-publicized policy for dealing with ongoing or unexpected health issues, with generous sick leave and a process to deal with possible abuses.  Managing physical and psychological stress is also essential for a healthy workplace.

 

Diversity Beyond the numbers. Presenters: Jaena Alabi (Auburn U.); Kawanna Bright (Florida International); Debnorah Lilton (Vanderbilt); Pambanisha Whaley (Auburn U.)

Psychological contract violation: The difference between an organization’s policies regarding diversity and its actual practice, and how this may disillusion diverse employees.  How to prevent this?   Make sure organization has fully-implemented commitment to diversity; don’t make promises that cannot be kept.

Racial microaggressions; insults, invalidations:  These are brief and commonplace verbal, behavioral, and environmental indignities, intentional or unintentional; slights or insults.  They are directed at members of certain racial groups, but can also be directed at members of any marginalized group–gender, sexual orientation, etc.   The originator’s intention is less important than the recipient’s perception of being insulted or dismissed.

Examples of incivility:  Using derogatory terms, insulting jokes, intellectual belittlement, ignoring contributions, silent treatment; flaunting status, attempting to turn others against the target, deliberate exclusion, lack of feedback or guidance, deliberately overloading the target with work.

What are the consequences to the organization?  Targeted employees suffer ‘death by a thousand cuts—‘ exhaustion, frustration, isolation, depression, anger, anxiety ….  Organizational consequences: cost of replacing employees who leave, reduced productivity as other staff members get drawn into the situation; negative publicity, other staff acting in kind and setting up a cycle of hostile behavior.

What can the organization do? Holding diversity workshops is not enough.  The organization should have zero tolerance for this behavior at any level; listen carefully to employees; and not make excuses for powerful instigators. Establish support for employees who have experienced incivility or aggression; document incidents/events; examine your own assumptions and behavior; engage in and encourage dialogue.

University of Illinois-Champaign Urbana - poster session on access

Poster from University of Illinois, Champaign-Urbana

(Dis)Abled: Transforming Disabling Library Spaces. Presenters:  Lorelei Rutledge and Alfred Mowdood (U. Utah)

Providing services to students with impairments is not about adapting to their disabilities but understanding how current library practices are disabling to some students.  This can be applied to students of different cultures as well as students with impairments.  The University of Utah’s response has been to develop a cultural competence program for librarians, library staff and student workers.  The emphasis is on respect for differences of all kinds, listening carefully and respectfully to library users, extensive and ongoing staff training, and aligning with the values and initiatives of the university.

Serving Those Who Serve: Outreach and Instruction for Cadets and Student Veterans.  Presenters:  Nancy Fawley (U. Alabama); Nikki Krysak (Norwich U.)

Cadets have very structured training and class schedules—similar to those of many student athletes.   Because of these demands, cadets often have problems balancing their military training and academic work.  Veterans are often older than other students, have a greater respect for authority, and have led units in difficult situations.  But they may be uncomfortable seeking help with academic issues or speaking with others about their military service.  They may also have ‘invisible’ impairments such as post-traumatic stress syndrome (PTSD) that can manifest itself in subtle ways, affecting their ability to function in the classroom.

The library can help cadets and veterans by setting up peer mentoring programs to help new cadets/veteran students, providing workshops and self-service study tools (such as online resource guides to various subjects), and creating study spaces that are comfortable and safe for veterans who may  be suffering from PTSD.

Mutant Superheroes, Contained Chaos, and Smelly Pets: Library Innovation Through Imaginary Anarchy.  Presenter: Keith Gilbertson (Virginia Tech)

Gilbertson gave a very personal, engaging talk on the importance of listening to and supporting staff with differences, and their unique ability to contribute to organizational innovation and change.  His job at Virginia Tech is to subvert current practices in a progressive way.  The trick is to do this while still advancing the institution’s goals.

On April 4, Wesleyan University will host its annual lecture for the Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences:

Title:  Faults, Friction and Earthquake Prediction: Learning about Seismogenesis by Studying Ancient Faults from Connecticut, Italy, & Greece.

Speaker: Wesleyan Associate Professor of Earth and Environmental Sciences Phillip Resor.

When:  Thursday, April 4, 2013, 5pm

Where:  Usdan University Center, Rm. 108

This lecture is free and open to the public.

The Connecticut Academy of Arts and Sciences is the third-oldest learned society in the United States, founded in 1799 in New Haven “…to cultivate every art and science which may tend to advance the interest and happiness of a free and virtuous people…”  Wesleyan University has had a representative on the governing council of the Academy since 1974; most recently Peter Frenzel, Professor of German Studies Emeritus, represented Wesleyan.  Just this past year Pat Tully, Wesleyan University Librarian, has become the Wesleyan representative.

The purpose of the Academy is the dissemination of scholarly information via publications and lectures.  The Academy holds eight lectures each year, including the annual lecture at Wesleyan, which provide an opportunity to hear distinguished scholars speak about their work.

Since 1810, the Academy has published scholarly works on a variety of topics.  It currently has three series: Memoirs are monographs or booklength publications; Transactions are essays in history, economics, mathematics, archeology, languages, literature, and the natural sciences, and most recently, articles of an interdisciplinary nature; and A Manual of the Writings in Middle English is the definitive reference source in its field.  The Academy welcomes the submission of scholarly manuscripts for possible publication.

Membership in the Academy is by nomination. If you are interested in becoming a member or learning more about the Academy, please email caas@yale.edu

One Book, One Middletown activities for 2013 start today, Friday, March 1!  Join in the scavenger hunt using your QR code reader (or go to russelllibrary.org):

Copies of Ready Player One, the One Book, One Middletown selection for 2013, are available in the lobby of Olin Library.  Take a copy from the rack–no checkout necessary–and bring it back when you are finished reading it.   There are also copies available for checkout at Russell Library and for purchase from The Book Bower in Main Street Market.  For a complete list of activities: http://universitylibrarian.blogs.wesleyan.edu/2013/02/24/one-book-one-middletown-2013-selection-ready-player-one/

 

 

One Book, One Middletown is a community project sponsored by the Middletown Rotary Club, CT Humanities’ Center for the Book, Russell Library and the City of Middletown.  The goal is to encourage reading in the community by selecting a book that appeals to a variety of audiences, then holding events that bring people together to celebrate or explore aspects of the book.

This year’s selection is Ready Player One, by Ernest Cline.  The year is 2044, and people spend most of their time in the virtual reality game known as Oasis.  The death of the game’s creator triggers a ruthless scavenger hunt for his fortune, one that Wade Watts is determined to win.  In the process, he confronts not only threats with the virtual world of Oasis, but the grim reality and ultimate promise of the world outside the game.  The book is a well-written and thoughtful commentary on where we may be headed in the twenty-first century.

In the book, the game Oasis reflects its creator’s obsession with the 1980s—movies, music and gaming.  Many of the One Book events this year have a connection to that decade.  Other events celebrate the development of games and games culture.  And there are several book discussion groups to bring together people to talk about the book.  One Book events culminate with a Skype session with the author, Ernest Cline, who will talk with the audience about what inspired him to write the book and his thoughts on the issues raised by it.  Here is the complete list of One Book events this year:

March 1 – March 31 Scavenger hunt Start at Russell Library, Middlesex Community College Library, or the Book Bower (Main St. Market, 386 Main St., Middletown).
March 1, 3pm-6pm Gaming kick-off Achieve your own high scores on a variety of nostalgic 80s video games while enjoying pizza and other 80s sound bytes.  No registration required.  Hubbard Room, Russell Library (123 Broad St., Middletown).
March 6, 12:30pm Book discussion Led by Librarian Anne Paluck, Chapman Hall, Middlesex Community College (100 Training Hill Rd., Middletown).
March 13, 7pm Book discussion Led by Wesleyan Associate Professor Indira Karamcheti, in the Hubbard Room, Russell Library.
March 14, 7pm Documentary & discussion Screening of King of Kong:  A Fistful of Quarters, then discussion led by film critic Richard Alleva.  Hubbard Room, Russell Library.
March 16, 7pm (lesson); 8-11pm (party) Dance lesson and 80s dance party Vinnie’s Jump and Jive, 424 Main St., Middletown.
March 19, 7pm Game presentation and discussion Presentation by Quinnipiac Assistant Professor Ira Fay, ‘The Making of Games: Game Design and Development,’ in the Hubbard Room of Russell Library.  For five years Prof. Fay has been a senior game designer at Electronic Arts, Pogo division.
March 22, 6pm Emporium book discussion Led by Middletown High School students, at the Emporium in Main Street Market, 386 Main St., Middletown.
April 4, 8pm Film screening Big Trouble in Little China, with introduction by Marc Longenecker, Wesleyan Visiting Instructor of Film Studies.  Goldsmith Family Cinema, 301 Washington Terrace, Wesleyan University.
April 6, 2pm Author talk and discussion Talk via Skype with Ernest Cline, author of Ready Player One.  Scavenger hunt winners announced.  Hubbard Room, Russell Library.

 

You do not have to read the book to participate in many of these events.  But copies of Ready Player One are available for check out at Olin Library and at Russell Library, and can be purchased at the Book Bower in Main Street Market, 386 Main St.  There will also be some copies available for free in Olin’s lobby and other places in Middletown.

If you are looking for a way to connect with the community beyond Wesleyan, participating in one or more One Book events is a great way to do it!  For updates on One Book events, follow us on Twitter:   @1BookMiddCT

(You may be thinking: “She is getting lazy with two ‘Argus’ posts in a row.”  Yes, I am, but I couldn’t resist!)

From the Argus, March 21, 1888, p. 129:

Stormlets.

The novelty of a chapel cut was appreciated by the score of men who had courage enough to wade and roll up to the chapel steps Tuesday morning. The door was shut, and, after waiting the customary five minutes, the yell was given and the men returned to their rooms to wait for the storm to blow over. Professor Van Benschoten was the only member of the faculty who appeared. He stated that no doubt it was a big storm, but it couldn’t compare with the one Xenophon describes. Nevertheless, the storm was big enough to stop all college work. Wesleyan was desolate and no mistake. No teams passed through High street for two days, and the consequence was that provisions ran short. The college club were obliged to take to condensed milk, and, as the article is not drinkable, much suffering was caused among the freshmen. The overworked men in the college, however, hailed the storm as a blessed relief from work.

Prof. Rice preached Sunday in Springfield. He was not able to get nearer home than New Britain, where he stayed until the roads were open. Prof. Van Vleck had started for Baltimore, but he was snowed up in New York and was unable to leave until Thursday, when he took the boat to New Haven. Griffin, Gill and Munroe were snowed up on the New England road. Their experiences will be given farther on. Barto and Alexander have not been heard from yet, but undoubtedly they are in snug quarters.

Professor Atwater, returning home from his office Monday night, really became alarmed. It was just after dusk when he started. The snow was of that blinding class which blows over the “desolate moors,” and the moon had hidden herself behind an adjacent snow bank. After a half-hour’s hard work the professor found himself opposite the A. Δ. Φ. house and not able to go farther. In response to his requests for assistance a number of college men, spurning his offers of gold, placed him in their midst and escorted him safely to his anxious family.

The men in college can now realize what it is to be shut off from the outside world. No New York papers for five days, no mails for a week and no telegraphic communication are things you don’t often read about.

Clark and Smith, the Wesleyan amateur photographers, secured some good views of blockaded trains and other curiosities.

The “Mugg’s Landing” theatrical troupe were entertained one afternoon of their forced stop in the city by the college songs which a number of the men sang to them.

Some selections from the January 21, 1879 edition of the Argus:

Quite a number of student staid here during vacation. With skating, calling, etc., the time passed rapidly away. Judging by the number of New Year’s calls some claim to have made, the city must be larger than we had previously supposed. The skating on Pameacha was unusually fine for a few days, and was well improved by the students remaining here and by the young people of the city. One student, we hear, paid but a single visit to the pond. On his way thither, skates in hand, the irrepressible gamin shouted after him, “Say, fresh, where are you going with those double cutters?” Our friend says his feet are not really large, but he cares nothing about skating.

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Middletown has been enjoying a season of unusually fine sleighing. Every afternoon the pleasure seekers have made the streets lively. During the evenings the double cutters have carried the merry loads from High street to the river. Old and young alike gave made coasting one of their principal employments. The more timid confined themselves to William street, but those who were brave enough to risk sprained arms and “barked shins” found a much more exciting field on College street.

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In general the selection of papers for the college reading-room is excellent. There is, however, what seems to us a marked deficiency. We have no first-class Democratic daily. To be sure, nine-tenths of the members of the college are of the opposite political faith, but should not some considerations be paid to the wishes of even a small minority? Besides, there are few of us who would not like a chance to read both sides; still fewer whom such reading would not benefit. Let us have at least one of the best Democratic dailies.

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With this number we wish our readers a Happy New Year. If yours is already a happy one, then for sympathy’s sake, if for no other reason, ask yourself if your Argus subscription is paid; if it is, well and good; if not, then make the Business Manager’s new year also a happy one, by remitting to him certain moneys. Though naturally of a jovial and happy disposition, we can see that the cares of his office are beginning to wear upon him. Remember, that he who removes a pebble from the road helps on humanity, and if that pebble is an Argus bill, don’t let it lie.

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The preceptress of a ladies’ boarding school, not a thousand miles from here, remarks that she cannot have the Argus in her house any more, it is so coarse. After deep and prayerful meditation, the Board of Editors have decided to continue the publication of the paper, at least for a short time longer.

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